Practical World is theTrue News (only) Magazine

Practical World is theTrue News (only) Magazine
Practical World is theTrue News (only) Magazine

#Health : US suicides rate rises up due to new type of depression caused by drugs and social-media !

Between 1999 and 2016, 25 states saw suicide rates jump more than 30 percent. There was variation: They rose by just under 6 percent in Delaware to more than 57 percent in North Dakota, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers. 






"Suicide is just one of the three leading causes of death that are on the rise, and these statistics don't begin to reveal the emotional, social and financial toll that suicide exacts on individuals, families and communities that are left devastated," CDC Principal Deputy Director Dr. Anne Schuchat said during a media briefing Thursday. 

The most recent data (2014-2016) in the report shows a fourfold difference in state suicide rates, ranging from 6.9 per 100,000 residents per year in Washington, D.C., to 29.2 per 100,000 residents in Montana. 

In 2016 alone, nearly 45,000 Americans aged 10 and older died by suicide, the report showed. 

Just this week, the iconic American fashion designer Kate Spade hanged herself in her New York City home. Her husband, Andy Spade, said his wife had suffered from anxiety during their 24-year marriage and had experienced bouts of severe depression in the past six years. 

Suicide rarely springs from a single factor, the CDC report authors noted. While mental health conditions are a main focus of suicide prevention efforts, the authors found that more than half of Americans who died by suicide did not have a diagnosed mental health condition. 



Relationship problems or loss, substance abuse, physical health problems, and job, money, legal or housing stresses often contributed to suicide risk, the report showed. Guns were the most common method of suicide used by people with and without a diagnosed mental health condition. 

Jeffrey Bridge is director of the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.


Jeffrey Bridge is director of the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. He said the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention have set a goal to cut the nation's annual suicide rate 20 percent by 2025. 

"The CDC's analysis of suicide trends suggests no state is making acceptable progress toward reaching this objective, and for many states the burden of suicide is growing," Bridge said in a statement Thursday. 

"These data should be a call to action for all states to intensify their focus on implementing suicide prevention policies and programs that have the strongest potential for helping save the most lives," he said. 

The CDC researchers agreed that states need to address a wide range of risk factors in suicide prevention efforts, and they need to include government, public health, health care, employers, education, media and community organizations. 

The agency offered these suicide prevention steps that can be taken by everyone: learning the warning signs of suicide, to identify and appropriately respond to people at risk; reducing at-risk people's access to guns, medications and other means of suicide; and contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline -- 1-800-273-TALK (8255) -- for help. 

The findings were published June 7 as a CDC Vital Signs report. 


Unsettling experiences on social media


Unsettling experiences on social media may leave you feeling more than just anti-social -- they might raise your risk for depression, new research suggests. 






Curiously, the reverse doesn't seem to be true. The survey of nearly 1,200 college students indicated that a positive online exchange only marginally reduced depression risk. 

"We were not surprised that having negative experiences was related to depression," said study lead author Dr. Brian Primack, who directs the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Research on Media, Technology, and Health. "This is something that we hear from people a lot in their subjective experience. 

"However, we were surprised with how there was a very weak relationship -- or even none at all in some models -- between having positive experiences and having less depression," he added. "We expected positive experiences to be more powerful.

Still, Primack said that the notion that negativity packs a stronger punch is not an exclusively online phenomenon. 

"There is a theory called 'negativity bias', which suggests that negative things we encounter in the world are often more powerful than positive ones," he said. "For example, you might be taking four different classes in college, and you might have done very well in three of them. But it is that fourth class that you did very poorly in that takes up nearly all of your mental energy.

But, he continued, there's an "argument for why the online world might particularly lend itself to negativity bias. This is because the online world tends to be completely oversaturated with false positivity. People get jaded to all of the 'likes' and all of the enthusiastic happy birthday wishes. But, when there is an angry or negative comment, it tends to stick out like a sore thumb and to feel particularly bad." 

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The study authors noted that depression is the leading cause of disability around the world. 

The survey participants were enrolled full-time at the University of West Virginia in 2016. About two-thirds were women, nearly three-quarters were white and about half were single. All were between the ages of 18 and 30, at an average age of 20. The study authors said about 83 percent of all social media users fall within this age range. 

The respondents indicated how much of their social media experience tended to be positive and how much negative. The study participants decided for themselves what constituted a good or bad online experience, without any instruction from the research team. 

A second questionnaire assessed the presence of depressive symptoms. 

The researchers found that for every 10 percent increase in unpleasant social media experiences, the risk of developing symptoms of depression rose by 20 percent. 

Conversely, every 10 percent rise in positive interactions was linked to just a 4 percent drop in depression risk. 

But there could be a chicken-and-egg factor at work here. While it could be that negative social media experiences do lead to more depressive symptoms, it could also be that depressed users are likelier to have more negative social media experiences. Or, they could tend to view their online experience more negatively, the study authors suggested. 

"I would imagine personality and mental state would definitely play a role," Primack said. "In other words, someone who is already feeling left out and tender might be particularly vulnerable to online negativity. This brings up the potential for a vicious cycle." 

Either way, as a protective measure, Primack suggests "limiting overall social media exposure." Or sticking to online platforms and interactions that are less likely to go south. 

Psychiatrists could also work to help depressed patients develop more resilience when confronted with negative online experiences, he suggested. 



The study findings were published June 7 in the journal Depression and Anxiety.
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